Bibliography

Here is a list of recent books that we think are relevant to Big Video:

  • Bates, Charlotte (Ed.) (2015). Video Methods: Social Science Research in Motion. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Berson, Josh (2015). Computable Bodies: Instrumented Life and the Human Somatic Niche. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Broth, Mathias, Laurier, Eric & Mondada, Lorenza (Eds.) (2014). Studies of Video Practices: Video at Work. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Carlyle, Angus & Lane, Cathy (Eds.) (2013). On Listening. London: Uniformbooks.
  • Goldman, Ricki, Pea, Roy, Barron, Brigid & Derry, Sharon J. (Eds.) (2007). Video Research in the Learning Sciences. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Harris, Anne M. (2016). Video as Method: Understanding Qualitative Research. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Haw, Kaye & Hadfield, Mark (2011). Video in Social Science Research: Functions and Forms. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Heath, Christian, Hindmarsh, Jon & Luff, Paul (2010). Video in Qualitative Research: Analysing Social Interaction in Everyday Life. London: Sage.
  • Jenks, Christopher Joseph (2011). Transcribing Talk and Interaction: Issues in the Representation of Communication Data. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Kendrick, Kobin H. (2017). Using Conversation Analysis in the Lab. Research on Language and Social Interaction 50(1): 1-11.
  • Knoblauch, Hubert, Schnettler, Bernt, Raab, Jürgen & Soeffner, Hans-Georg (Eds.) (2006). Video Analysis: Methodology and Methods. Oxford: Peter Lang.
  • Lane, Cathy & Carlyle, Angus (Eds.) (2013). In the Field: The Art of Field Recording. London: Uniformbooks.
  • Pink, Sarah (2009). Doing Sensory Ethnography. London: Sage.
  • Pink, Sarah (Ed.) (2012). Advances in Visual Methodology. London: Sage.
  • Schröter, Jens (2014). 3D: History, Theory and Aesthetics of the Transplane Image. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Shrum, Wesley M. & Scott, Gregory S. (2017). Video Ethnography in Practice: Planning, Shooting, and Editing for Social Analysis. London: Sage.
  • Svensson, Patrik (2016). Big Digital Humanities: Imagining a Meeting Place for the Humanities and the Digital. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
  • Théberge, Paul, Devine, Kyle & Everrett, Tom (Eds.) (2015). Living Stereo: Histories and Cultures of Multichannel Sound. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Tricart, Celine (2017). 3D Filmmaking: Techniques and Best Practices for Stereoscopic Filmmakers. London: Focal Press.
  • Ylirisku, Salu & Buur, Jacob (2007). Designing with Video: Focusing the User-centred Design Process. London: Springer.

And here is our list of what we regard as some of the most important landmark publications that have paved the way to Big Video:

  • Albrecht, Gary L. (1985). Videotape Safaris: Entering the Field with a Camera. Qualitative Sociology 8(4): 325-344.
  • Ashmore, Malcolm & Reed, Darren (2000). Innocence and Nostalgia in Conversation Analysis: The Dynamic Relations of Tape and Transcript. Forum: Qualitative Social Research 1(3).
  • Birdwhistell, Ray L. (1970). Kinesics and Context: Essays on Body Motion Communication. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
  • Bowers, John, O'Brien, Jon & Pycock, James (1996). Practically Accomplishing Immersion: Cooperation in and for Virtual Environments, in CSCW 96: Proceedings of the ACM 1996 Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Boston, MA, ACM Press.
  • Branigan, Edward (2006). Projecting a Camera: Language-Games in Film Theory. London: Routledge.
  • Braun, Marta (1995). Picturing Time: The Work of Etienne-Jules Marey (1830-1904). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Brown, Katrina Myrvang, Dilley, Rachel & Marshall, Keith (2008). Using a Head-Mounted Video Camera to Understand Social Worlds and Experiences. Sociological Research Online 13(6).
  • Davis, Martha (2001). Film Projectors as Microscopes: Ray L. Birdwhistell & Microanalysis of Interaction (1955-1975). Visual Anthropology Review 17(2): 39-49.
  • Erickson, Frederick (1982). Audiovisual Records as a Primary Data Source. Sociological Methods & Research 11(2): 213-232.
  • Goodwin, Charles (1981). Conversational Organisation: Interaction between Speakers and Hearers. New York: Academic Press.
  • Goodwin, Charles (1993). Recording Interaction in Natural Settings. Pragmatics 3(2): 181-209.
  • Fouse, Adam S., Weibel, Nadir, Hutchins, Edwin & Hollan, James D. (2011). ChronoViz: A System for Supporting Navigation of Time-coded Data. CHI 2011, in Vancouver, BC, Canada: 299-304.
  • Heath, Christian (1986). Body Movement and Speech in Medical Interaction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Jones, Nikki & Raymond, Geoffrey (2012). 'The Camera Rolls': Using Third-Party Video in Field Research. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 642(1): 109-123.
  • Laurier, Eric (2014). The Graphic Transcript: Poaching Comic Book Grammar for Inscribing the Visual, Spatial and Temporal Aspects of Action. Geography Compass 9(4): 235-248.
  • Laurier, Eric (2015). YouTube: Fragments of a Video-tropic Atlas. Area.
  • Leeds‚ÄźHurwitz, Wendy (1987). The Social History of the Natural History of an Interview: A Multidisciplinary Investigation of Social Communication. Research on Language and Social Interaction 20(1-4): 1-51.
  • Lomax, Helen & Casey, Neil (1998). Recording Social Life: Reflexivity and Video Methodology. Sociological Research Online 3(2). [Online]. Available: <http://www.socresonline.org.uk/3/2/1.html>. [17 May 2010].
  • Macbeth, Douglas (1999). Glances, Trances, and Their Relevance for a Visual Sociology. In Jalbert, Paul L. (Ed.), Media Studies: Ethnomethodological Approaches, Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America.
  • Modaff, John V. & Modaff, Daniel P. (2000). Technical Notes on Audio Recording. Research on Language & Social Interaction 33(1): 101-118.
  • Mondada, Lorenza (2006). Video Recording as the Reflexive Preservation and Configuration of Phenomenal Features for Analysis. In Knoblauch, Hubert, Schnettler, Bernt, Raab, Jürgen & Soeffner, Hans-Georg (Eds.), Video Analysis: Methodology and Methods, Oxford: Peter Lang: 51-67.
  • Norris, Sigrid (2012). Teaching Touch/Response-Feel: A First Step to an Analysis of Touch from an (Inter)active Perspective. In Norris, Sigrid (Ed.), Multimodality in Practice: Investigating Theory-in-Practice-through-Methodology, Abingdon: Routledge: 7-19.
  • Relieu, Marc, Zouinar, Moustafa & La Valle, Natalia (2007). At Home with Video Cameras. Home Cultures 4(1): 45-68.
  • Rouch, Jean (2003). Ciné-Ethnography. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Silverman, Kaja (2006). Death 24x a Second: Stillness and the Moving Image. London: Reaktion Books.
  • Soskin, William F. & John, Vera P. (1963). The Study of Spontaneous Talk. In Barker, Roger G. & Barker, Louise Shedd (Eds.), The Stream of Behavior: Exploration of Its Structure and Content, New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts: 228-281.
  • Tosi, Virgilio (2005). Cinema Before Cinema: The Origins of Scientific Cinematography. British Universities Film & Video Council.
  • Voutilainen, Liisa, Henttonen, Pentti, et al. (2014). Affective Stance, Ambivalence, and Psychophysiological Responses during Conversational Storytelling. Journal of Pragmatics 68: 1-24.
  • Woods, David K. & Dempster, Paul G. (2011). Tales From the Bleeding Edge: The Qualitative Analysis of Complex Video Data Using Transana. Forum: Qualitative Social Research 12(1).